“Facebook Fraud” as it Applies to Independent Film

“Facebook Fraud” as it Applies to Independent Film

The first time I used Facebook Ads, I was very gratified by the numbers it brought in, but it was also clear that something was amiss. When I looked at followers’ profiles, they didn’t make much sense. Just like Veritasium‘s video reports, these “individuals” also liked a bunch of very random pages, none of which suggested that a real person was behind the profile. Watch this video to learn why you shouldn’t waste your time and money setting up ads. Being able to purchase followers wasn’t a concept (to my knowledge), although it was pretty clear that Facebook was being clever/deceitful with their “advertising” model. But for us, at the time, it didn’t matter. We were still in development, were getting bloggers to write about the film, and could boast how many people “liked” us. We ended up attracting a lot of talent to the project, and I like to think that our audience engagement practices were a part of the draw. Our short film, America 1979, currently has over 250 followers, au natural. I think this is pretty good for a short film that is in post production. I find that the following helps: Post content consistently. You will stay in the algorithm. If you go dark for a while, you may find that less people are seeing your posts. That is why it’s good to have a specific member of your team assigned to social media. Post photos or articles and tag members of your community. It will force the content into their streams and their friends will be interested in a project that they are involved with. For...
Will other festivals follow True/False’s lead?

Will other festivals follow True/False’s lead?

Imagine knowing that if your film plays in 20 festivals, that you can gross an additional $10,000-20,000. How would that inform your filmmaking future?Great News! True/False Film Festival will now pay a $450 stipend to all filmmakers who come to the festival to exhibit their films. I love the transparency of this announcement as well as the motivation behind it. The fest organizers want to incentivize long term careers with this incentive, and hope to boost the stipend from $450 to $1000.  Imagine knowing that if your film plays in 20 festivals, that you can gross an additional $10,000-20,000. How would that inform your filmmaking future? A filmmaker could pay back outstanding debt incurred by the film, or use the funds for developing a new film. What I can’t help but wonder is why some of the larger festivals haven’t come up with this first. What can we do to encourage other festivals to follow suit?...